Saturday, February 1, 2014

The Acquisition Continues

On January 10, Gossips reported that the Galvan Initiatives Foundation had purchased the Hudson Upper Depot. Today, the Register-Star reports that Galvan has purchased not just the former train station but all of the Van Kleeck property in Hudson: "Van Kleeck's Tire closes Hudson business." 

Bing.com
In addition to the historic train station, Galvan's latest acquisition includes but what remains of the Gifford-Wood Foundry and Machine Shop.

Courtesy Pat Fenoff

9 comments:

  1. Are properties owned by Galvan Initiatives Foundation effectively removed from the tax rolls?

    Anyone who frequented Harmon's auto shop knew the speech about property taxes in Hudson. More than anything else, taxes drove Harmon away.

    After he closed I used Van Kleeck's. They were kind of expensive, but good. Well, imagine their taxes!

    What's happening in Hudson can't be unprecedented, but it sure is weird.

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  2. what if galvan dies? i'm serious, what if eric t galloway dies? i mean no harm to come to the man but what if? what if he changes his mind and no longer is fond of the city of Hudson? what if he gets a new "vision" or glasses? what if all the galvan property turns overnight into non-profit? the city and the taxpayers will be left holding the bag that is what if. i think it about time for the city to require a rather large insurance policy before galvan/lantern/walt disney is allowed any building permit/variance/rent payment or conduct any business that involves the city of Hudson, or, the city purchase it's own insurance to protect it's citizens against any default on behalf of galvan.

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    1. Don't count on the city doing anything to protect itself from potential downside. Galvin's "grant making", orchestrated by Rick Scaler, has one purpose, to neutralize opposition. Most people who love what he's doing, have received a grant or are looking for one, for themselves, family members or otherwise connected friends.

      Galloway is addicted to these acquisitions. But we all know that addiction never ends until the addict hits rock bottom. Let's hope he doesn't take us all down with him.

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  3. In the meantime it would be heartening to know how many sellers have refused Galvan's advances. There have been several, but the details are not public knowledge.

    However this would be only one answer to the Libertarian formula to let the market decide such things. The latter view never makes any distinctions about what is and isn't seemly, to which I'd answer that culture itself - any culture - doesn't amount to much more than the customs its members value.

    Placed in context of art and art-making, the novelty of good art exists within that little sliver of the "[not] much more," while bad art is just unseemly.

    As if to mock those who pine for rules, great art will often be terribly rude. But there's still a difference between good art and bad art. (The ineffable distinction often runs an uncanny parallel to good and bad standards of conduct.)

    I'm not making a judgement here, only inviting a conversation about seemliness. If more often than not market-driven art has no enduring value, then why isn't the current subject also one in which market forces alone can add nothing of value.

    For anyone who can't spot it, these are ruminations worthy of a Burkean conservative.

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  4. when will this monster of acquisitions take off his mask and reveal his motive

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  5. Patiently awaiting the fall of Atlas? Despite cronies face first in the public trough, isn't Mr Galloway entitled to an accepted level of market concentration? He's doing wonders for city center property values.

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  6. henry von ameringen and eric galloway do not seem to be in nay hurry toreally help the city of hudson with the senior center and the librbary.

    are they really going to spend the money and do the work ?

    they have plenty of money. outside of hudson last year they bought a 10 million dollar townhouse in greenwich village and , at 60 square feet of living space, the largest mansion in new jersey. that alone was for 4 million.

    they arent short of cash. whena re they really going to start the work on the senior center and librbary. hudson sorely needs these facilities. for the old, and the young children.

    henry von ameringen has the money. does he really have the intention or is the land banking they are doing just a way to offload money so its not in his estate ?

    its time for henry to answer these questions. eric doesnt have the money. henry does.

    the way they are behaving, its not clear that they really will help the community by actaully building the facilities.

    whats the hold up. break ground on the armory and get it going. the city has lots of porr and young people who need this. building more real estate isnt helping the poor. its helping henry and eric.

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  7. I'm pretty sure the easiest way to find the answer to the question of which properties owned by GalVan are on the tax rolls is by searching school taxes on the HCSD website: http://www.infotaxonline.com/FindProperty.aspx

    Most properties do appear to be on the tax rolls, but many are likely at reduced rates most likely due to "renovation in progress"/lack of occupancy by rental tenants.

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